Distribution and toxicity of sediment-associated pesticides in urban and agricultural waterways from Illinois, USA

Authors

  • Yuping Ding,

    1. Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901, USA
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  • Amanda D. Harwood,

    1. Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901, USA
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  • Heather M. Foslund,

    1. Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901, USA
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  • Michael J. Lydy

    Corresponding author
    1. Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901, USA
    • Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901, USA.
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Abstract

A statewide investigation of insecticide presence and sediment toxicity was conducted in Illinois, USA, from June to August 2008. Twenty sediment samples were collected from urban areas throughout Illinois, and 49 sediment samples were collected from 14 agriculture-dominated counties in central and southern Illinois. Ten-day sediment toxicity tests were conducted using the amphipod Hyalella azteca, and 59% of the urban sites and 2% of the agricultural locations sampled caused significant mortality in the amphipods. The field sediments were analyzed for 29 pesticides, including 19 organochlorines, one organophosphate, and nine pyrethroids. The detection frequencies of organochlorines, chlorpyrifos, and pyrethroids were 95, 65, and 95%, respectively, for urban sites, and 45, 6.1, and 47%, respectively, for agricultural sites. Based on toxic unit analysis, bifenthrin was the main contributor to the detected mortality in urban sediments. The present study provides the first broad assessment of pesticide prevalence in both urban and agriculture areas in Illinois. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:149–157. © 2009 SETAC

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