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Fate of triclosan and triclocarban in soil columns with and without biosolids surface application

Authors

  • Jeong-Wook Kwon,

    1. Mississippi State Chemical Laboratory, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi, USA
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  • Kang Xia

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA
    • Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA.
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Abstract

The leaching and transformation behaviors of triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) in soil columns (20 cm high, 4 cm in diameter) packed with an agricultural soil (Roxana very fine sandy loam) with and without biosolids surface application were investigated. The column leachates and soil samples were analyzed for TCS, TCC, and their transformation products. Significantly more TCS was transformed compared with TCC. Surface application of biosolids significantly retarded their transformation. Downward movement of TCS and TCC occurred within a 10-cm soil depth. Methyl-TCS was not detectable in the leachates but was detected in the top 5-cm soil layer, with more appearing in the biosolids-applied soil. At the end of the column study, carbanilide (CBA) was the only detectable TCC reductive dechlorination product in the soil. No TCC reductive dechlorination products were detectable in the leachates. Detection of 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) and 4-chloroaniline (4-CA) suggested the occurrence of TCC hydrolysis. Rapid leaching of 4-CA through the soil column was observed. The 3,4-DCA was detected throughout the entire 20-cm depth of the soil column but not in the leachates. The fact that only small percentages of the transformed TCS and TCC appeared, after a 101-d column study, in the forms of the products analyzed suggested that either the investigated transformation pathways were minor pathways or further rapid transformation of those products had occurred. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2012;31:262–269. © 2011 SETAC

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