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Gastrointestinal absorption, metabolic debromination, and hydroxylation of three commercial polybrominated diphenyl ether mixtures by common carp

Authors

  • Yan-Hong Zeng,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
    2. Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • Xiao-Jun Luo,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
    • State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
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  • Hua-Shan Chen,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
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  • Le-Huan Yu,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
    2. Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • She-Jun Chen,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
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  • Bi-Xian Mai

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
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Abstract

The gastrointestinal absorption, metabolic debromination, and hydroxylation of three commercial brominated diphenyl ether (BDE) mixtures were separately studied in juvenile common carp. The absorption rate of penta-BDE was higher than that of octa- and deca-BDE, likely because of the lower molecular volumes of its major congeners. However, no significantly positive relationships were found between the number of bromine atoms and the absorption rate, especially for congeners with a bromine atom number larger than six. The major congeners in fish carcass were, respectively, BDE-47 and BDE-100 in the penta-BDE exposure; BDE-154, -155, -149, and BDE-153 in the octa-BDE exposure; and BDE-154, -155, -149, -188, -179, and BDE-202 in the deca-BDE exposure. Congeners with at least one meta- or para- doubly flanked bromine atom easily undergo metabolic debromination in fish. None of the targeted MeO-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners were detected in serum samples, implying that the methylation of OH-PBDE is not likely occurring in fish. Eleven OH-PBDEs and several unidentified OH-PBDE congeners were found in penta-BDE-exposed fish. The similar level among three mono-OH-BDE47 congeners suggested that the position of OH in the phenyl ring is not selective. The hydroxylation is not a significant metabolic pathway compared with debromination. No OH-PBDE congeners were found in the serum samples from deca-BDE-exposed fish, which may attributable to the low level of PBDE precursors in fish. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2012;31:731–738. © 2011 SETAC

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