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Mammalian glucocorticoid metabolites act as androgenic endocrine disruptors in the medaka (Oryzias latipes)

Authors

  • Britta Grillitsch,

    Corresponding author
    1. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria
    • Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.
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  • Dominik Altmann,

    1. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria
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  • Michael Schabuss,

    1. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria
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  • Horst Zornig,

    1. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria
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  • Irene Sommerfeld-Stur,

    1. Animal Breeding and Genetics, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria
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  • Erich Möstl

    1. Biochemistry, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria
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Abstract

Glucocorticoid metabolites enter the aquatic environment via mammalian excrements. Molecular structures of their C19O3 metabolites strongly resemble the major fish androgen 11-ketotestosterone. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the cortisol metabolite 5α-androstan-3,11,17-trione acts similarly to 11-ketotestosterone by employing a fish screening assay for endocrine-active substances. After 21 d, both 11-oxygenated compounds had masculinized sex characteristics of the anal fin in female medaka in a dose-dependent manner. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:1613–1620. © 2010 SETAC

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