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Effects of suspended solids and dissolved organic carbon on nickel toxicity

Authors

  • Christina E. Cloran,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    • Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA.
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  • G. Allen Burton,

    1. Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
    2. School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA
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  • Chad R. Hammerschmidt,

    1. Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
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  • W. Keith Taulbee,

    1. School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA
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  • Kevin W. Custer,

    1. Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
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  • Katlin L. Bowman

    1. Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, Ohio 45435, USA
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Abstract

Nickel (Ni) is a common and potentially toxic heavy metal in many fluvial ecosystems. We examined the potentially competitive and complementary roles of suspended sediment and a dissolved organic ligand, humate, in affecting the partitioning and toxicity of Ni to a model organism, Daphnia magna, in both batch and stream-recirculating flume (SRF) tests. Sediments included a fine-grained deposit, montmorillonite, and kaolinite. Survival of D. magna was unaffected by the range of suspended solids used in the present study (8–249 mg/L). However, exposure to suspended solids that were amended with Ni had a deleterious effect on test organism survival, which is attributed to partitioning of Ni into the aqueous phase. At comparable levels of dissolved Ni, survival of D. magna was reduced in tests with Ni-amended suspended solids compared to Ni-only aqueous exposures, suggesting potentiation between these two aquatic contaminants. Addition of humate attenuated toxicity to D. magna in both Ni-only and Ni-amended suspended sediment exposures. These results indicate that organic ligands and suspended solids have important functions in affecting the bioavailability and toxicity of Ni to aquatic organisms and should be incorporated into predictive models to protect ecosystem quality. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010; 29:1781–1787. © 2010 SETAC

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