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Persistence of estrogenic activity in soils following land application of biosolids

Authors

  • Kate A. Langdon,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Agriculture, Food and Wine and Waite Research Institute, University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    2. Water for a Healthy Country Research Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
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  • Michael S.t.J. Warne,

    1. Water for a Healthy Country Research Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
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  • Ronald J. Smernik,

    1. School of Agriculture, Food and Wine and Waite Research Institute, University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • Ali Shareef,

    1. Water for a Healthy Country Research Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
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  • Rai S. Kookana

    1. Water for a Healthy Country Research Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
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Abstract

Estrogenic compounds may enter the environment when biosolids are applied to land. In the present study, soil samples were collected over 4 mo from a field trial following addition of biosolids. The recombinant yeast estrogen screen bioassay identified estrogenic activity in the soil at all sampling times to concentrations up to 2.3 µg 17β-estradiol equivalency/kg. The present results indicate the potential for estrogenic compounds to persist in soil following biosolids application. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;33:26–28. © 2013 SETAC

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