Concentrations of perfluorinated compounds in human blood from twelve cities in China

Authors

  • Yuanyuan Pan,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China
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  • Yali Shi,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China
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  • Jieming Wang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China
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  • Yaqi Cai,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China
    • State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China.
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  • Yongning Wu

    1. National Institute for Nutrition and Food Safety, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China
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Abstract

We detected nine perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in 233 human whole-blood samples collected from 12 cities (from 12 provinces and districts) in China. Perfluorinated compounds could be detected in all blood samples, with perfluorooctane sulfonate (C8, PFOS) as the most prominent PFC. Mean PFOS concentrations were measured at 3.06 to 34.0 µg/L, accounting for the majority of the total perfluorinated compounds (ΣPFCs) (54–87%) in blood samples, except those from Kunming. Perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorohexane sulfonate (C6, PFHxS) concentrations were positively correlated in blood samples (p < 0.01). Significant relations among perfluorooctanoate (C8, PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (C9, PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (C10, PFDA), and perfluoroundecanoic acid (C11, PFUnDA) (p < 0.05) were also observed in the present study, indicating that they may come from a similar exposure pathway in China. In general, gender-related differences were found for PFHxS and ΣPFCs concentrations, which were significantly higher in males than in females (p < 0.05). In the 20- to 29-year age group, gender influence was also found for PFHxS and PFOS concentrations. The mean blood concentration of PFOS (10.6 µg/L) in the present study was comparable with results from other countries, while PFOA and PFHxS (1.39 µg/L and 0.57 µg/L, respectively) were often lower. This can probably be attributed to a different exposure pathway of the general population in China as compared to other countries. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:2695–2701. © 2010 SETAC

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