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Phage display as a novel screening tool for primary toxicological targets

Authors

  • Bieke Van Dorst,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium
    2. Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research (ILVO), Ankerstraat 1, B-8400 Oostende, Belgium
    • Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium.
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  • Wim De Coen,

    1. Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium
    2. European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), Annankatu 18, F-00120 Helsinki, Finland
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  • Ronny Blust,

    1. Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium
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  • Johan Robbens

    1. Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium
    2. Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research (ILVO), Ankerstraat 1, B-8400 Oostende, Belgium
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Abstract

In the present study the use of phage display as a screening tool to determine primary toxicological targets was investigated. These primary toxicological targets are the targets in the cell with which a chemical compound initially interacts and that are responsible for consecutive (toxic) effects. Nickel was used as model compound for the present study. By selection of Ni-binding peptides out of a 12-mer peptide phage library, it was possible to identify primary toxicological targets of Ni (and other metals). The selected Ni-binding peptides showed similarities to important primary toxicological targets of Ni, such as the hydrogenase nickel incorporation protein (hypB) and the Mg/Ni/Co transporter (corA). This shows that phage display, which is already widely used in other research fields, also has potential in ecotoxicology, as a novel screening tool with which to determine primary toxicological targets of chemical compounds. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:250–255. © 2009 SETAC

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