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PBDEs and methoxylated analogues in sediment cores from two Michigan, USA, inland lakes

Authors

  • Patrick W. Bradley,

    1. Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
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  • Yi Wan,

    1. University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
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  • Paul D. Jones,

    1. University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
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  • Steve Wiseman,

    1. University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
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  • Hong Chang,

    1. State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory for Lake Pollution Control, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing, China
    2. State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
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  • Michael H.W. Lam,

    1. State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
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  • David T. Long,

    1. Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
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  • John P. Giesy

    Corresponding author
    1. Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
    2. University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    3. State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory for Lake Pollution Control, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing, China
    4. State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
    5. City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
    6. University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, SAR, China
    7. King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    • Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA.
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Abstract

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been widely studied in sediments from the North American Great Lakes; however, no studies have been conducted of occurrences of methoxylated (MeO-) PBDEs in abiotic compartments in this region. In the present study, 23 tri- to hepta-PBDEs and 12 MeO-PBDEs were analyzed in dated sediment cores collected from two inland lakes (White Lake and Muskegon Lake) in Michigan, USA. Concentrations of Σ23PBDEs ranged from 3.9 × 10−1 to 2.4 × 100 and from 9.8 × 10−1 to 3.9 × 100 ng/g dry weight in White Lake and Muskegon Lake, respectively. The historical trends of tri- to hepta-PBDEs in the two lakes were different, possibly because of different input and remediation histories. The tri- to hepta-PBDE profiles were similar in the two lakes, with BDE-47 as the predominant congener, followed by BDE-99 and BDE-183. A different temporal trend for BDE-183 was found compared with other PBDEs, which is consistent with debromination of high-brominated PBDEs during sedimentation and aging. Methoxylated-PBDEs were detected only in Muskegon Lake (3.6 × 10−3 to 1.2 × 10−1 ng/g dry wt). Methoxylated PBDEs showed different temporal trends compared with tri- to hepta-PBDEs. The differences in patterns of concentrations of MeO-PBDEs in the two lakes might be due to different aquatic communities in each lake. The occurrences of MeO-PBDEs could be the major source of hydroxylated–polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) observed in organisms collected in these freshwater systems. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2011; 30:1236–1242. © 2011 SETAC

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