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A novel toxicity fingerprinting method for pollutant identification with lux-marked biosensors

Authors

  • Nigel L. Turner,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Plant and Soil Science, Cruickshank Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland, United Kingdom
    • Department of Plant and Soil Science, Cruickshank Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland, United Kingdom
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  • Alison Horsburgh,

    1. Department of Plant and Soil Science, Cruickshank Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland, United Kingdom
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  • Graeme I. Paton,

    1. Department of Plant and Soil Science, Cruickshank Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland, United Kingdom
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  • Ken Killham,

    1. Department of Plant and Soil Science, Cruickshank Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland, United Kingdom
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  • Andrew Meharg,

    1. Department of Plant and Soil Science, Cruickshank Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland, United Kingdom
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  • Sandy Primrose,

    1. AZUR Environmental, 540 Eskdale Road Winnersh Triangle Wokingham, Berks RG41 5TU, United Kingdom
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  • Norval J. C. Strachan

    1. Department of Plant and Soil Science, Cruickshank Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland, United Kingdom
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Abstract

At present, monitoring and identification of environmental pollutants in freshwater is performed predominantly by laboratory-based chemical analysis. Such an approach is often time-consuming and expensive and requires prior knowledge of the pollutants present for most practical purposes, because chemical identification techniques are generally specific to individual pollutants or pollutant classes [3]. In addition, total pollutant load does not always accurately reflect environmental toxicity because pollutant bioavailability is dependent upon water chemistry. For these reasons, a movement is increasing toward the use of biological techniques for the monitoring of environmental pollution by industry and regulators alike [2].

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