Air—water exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the New York—New Jersey, USA, Harbor Estuary

Authors

  • Cari L. Gigliotti,

    1. Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
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  • Paul A. Brunciak,

    1. Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
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  • Jordi Dachs,

    1. Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
    2. Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18–26, Barcelona 08034, Spain
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  • Thomas R. Glenn IV,

    1. Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
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  • Eric D. Nelson,

    1. Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
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  • Lisa A. Totten,

    1. Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
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  • Steven J. Eisenreich

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
    • Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
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Abstract

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, n = 36) were measured in the gas and particle phases in the atmosphere and the dissolved and particle phases in the waters of the New York—New Jersey Harbor Estuary, USA, during a weeklong intensive field campaign in July 1998. Mean total (gas + particulate) phenanthrene and pyrene concentrations were 3.3 and 0.33 ng/m3, respectively, over Raritan Bay, and 14 and 1.1 ng/m3, respectively, over New York Harbor. Similar PAH profiles (p values < 0.01) in the atmospheric gas phase and the dissolved phase in water demonstrate the close coupling of the air and water compartments. Air—water exchange fluxes of PAHs estimated using shore-based air data lead to erroneous flux estimates when compared to those derived using over-water air samples. The gross absorptive air—water flux dominates atmospheric loadings (wet, dry particle, gas absorption) to the estuary for PAHs of molecular weight < 234 g/mol. Dry particle deposition is increasingly more important for the higher-molecular-weight, particle-bound PAH species. Gross volatilization dominates gross absorption for the majority of PAHs in the New York—New Jersey Harbor Estuary.

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