Dechlorane Plus in house dust from E-waste recycling and urban areas in South China: Sources, degradation, and human exposure

Authors

  • Jing Wang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
    2. Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • Mi Tian,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
    2. Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • She-Jun Chen,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
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  • Jing Zheng,

    1. State Key Laboratory for Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China
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  • Xiao-Jun Luo,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
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  • Tai-Cheng An,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
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  • Bi-Xian Mai

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China
    • State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
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Abstract

Dechlorane Plus (DP) was measured in house dust from e-waste recycling and from urban and rural areas of South China, with geometric mean concentrations of 604, 14.5, and 2.89 ng/g, respectively. Dechlorane Plus in house dust in the e-waste area originated from e-waste recycling activities, whereas household appliances served as a major source of DP in urban house dust. The isomer ratios (fanti) of DP in most dust samples from the e-waste area were significantly lower than those in the urban and rural dust samples and the commercial mixture. Several [−1Cl + H] and [−2Cl + 2H] dechloro-DPs were identified in house dust from the e-waste area, and an a-Cl11 DP was qualified with concentrations of <55.1 ng/g. Photolytic degradation experiments were conducted by exposing anti-DP, syn-DP, and commercial DP solutions to ultraviolet (UV) light. The slight difference in isomeric half-life derived by photodegradation, as well as the lower fanti values in the e-waste combusted residue, suggest a significant influence of isomer-specific thermal degradation of DP during e-waste burning on isomer composition in house dust in the e-waste area. The average estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of DP via house dust ranged from 0.06 to 30.2 ng/d for adults and 0.14 to 121 ng/d for toddlers in the studied area. The average EDIs of a-Cl11 DP for adults and toddlers in the e-waste area were 0.07 and 0.18 ng/d, respectively. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2011;30:1965–1972. © 2011 SETAC

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