SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

REFERENCES

  • 1
    Darwin C. 1876. The variation of animals and plants under domestication, vol. 1, 2nd edition, revised. New York: Appleton.
  • 2
    Childe VG. 1951. Man makes himself. New York: Mentor.
  • 3
    Richerson PJ, Boyd R, Bettinger R. 2001. Was agriculture impossible during the Pleistocene but mandatory during the Holocene? A climate change hypothesis. Am Antiquity 66: 3874121.
  • 4
    Binford L. 1968. In pursuit of the past. London: Thames and Hudson.
  • 5
    Braidwood R. 1960. The agricultural revolution. Science 203: 130148.
  • 6
    Cohen MN. 1989. Health and the rise of civilization. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • 7
    Hodder I. 1990. The domestication of Europe: structure and contingency in neolithic societies. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.
  • 8
    Flannery KV. 1965. The ecology of early food production in Mesopotamia. Science 147: 12471256.
  • 9
    Flannery KV. 1969. Origins and ecological effects of early domestication in Iran and the Near East. In: UckoPJ, DimblebyGW, editors. The domestication and exploitation of plants and animals, Garden City: Natural History Press. p 80100.
  • 10
    Rindos D. 1984. The origins of agriculture: an evolutionary perspective. New York: Academic Press.
  • 11
    Rindos D. 1989. Darwinism and its role in the explanation of domestication. In: HarrisD, HillmanG, editors. Foraging and farming: the evolution of plant exploitation. London: Unwin.
  • 12
    Erlich PR, Raven PH. 1967. Butterflies and plants: a study in coevolution. Evolution 18: 586608.
  • 13
    Gremillion KJ. 1996. Diffusion and adoption of crops in evolutionary perspectives. J Anthropol Archaeol 15: 183204.
  • 14
    Gremillion KJ. 2002. Foraging theory and hypothesis testing in archaeology: an exploration of methodological problems and solutions. J Anthropol Archaeol 21: 142164.
  • 15
    O'Shea J. 1989. Role of wild resources in small-scale agricultural systems: tales from the lakes and the Plains. In: HalsteadP, O'SheaJ, editors. Bad year economics: cultural responses to risk and uncertainty. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p 5767.
  • 16
    Winterhalder B. 1981. Foraging strategies in the boreal forest: An analysis of Cree hunting and gathering. In: WinterhalterB, SmithEA, editors. Hunter-gatherer foraging strategies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. p 6698.
  • 17
    Hames RB, Vickers WT. 1982. Optimal diet breadth theory as a model to explain variability in Amazonian hunting. Am Ethnol 9: 358378.
  • 18
    Hassan F. 2002. Paleoclimate, food and culture change in Africa: an overview. In: HassanFA, editor. Drought, food, and culture. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum. p 126.
  • 19
    Pringle H. 1998. The slow birth of agriculture. Science 20: 1446.
  • 20
    Harlan J. 1999. Harvesting wild seeds and implications for domestication. In: AndersonP, editor. Prehistoric agriculture: new experimental and ethnographic approaches. Monograph 40, Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles. p 15.
  • 21
    Armelagos G, Harper K. 2005. Genomics at the origins of agriculture, part 1. Evol Anthropol 14: 6877.
  • 22
    Budiansky S. 1999. Covenant of the wild. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • 23
    Bumler MA, Byrne R. 1991. The ecological genetics of domestication and the origins of agriculture. Curr Anthropol 32: 2354.
  • 24
    Leach HM. 2003. Human domestication reconsidered. Curr Anthropol 44: 349368.
  • 25
    MasonIL, editor. 1984. Evolution of domesticated animals. London: Longman.
  • 26
    Pollan M. 2001. Botany of desire: a plant's eye view of the world. New York: Random House.
  • 27
    Redman C. 1999. Human impacts on ancient environments. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.
  • 28
    Yarnell R. 1963. Reciprocity in cultural ecology. Economic Botany 17: 333336.
  • 29
    Zohary D, Tchernov E, Horwitz, LK. 1998. The role of unconscious selection in the domestication of sheep and goats. J Zool 245: 129135.
  • 30
    Tchernov E. 1998. Are late Pleistocene environmental factors, faunal changes and cultural transformations casually connected? The case of the southern Levant. Paleorient 23: 209228.
  • 31
    Bar-Yosef O. 2002. The upper paleolithic revolution. Ann Rev Anthropol 31: 363393.
  • 32
    Kuhn SL, Stiner MC. 2001. The antiquity of hunter-gatherers. In: Panter-BrickC, LaaytonR, Rowley-ConwayP, editors. Hunter-gatherers: an interdisciplinary perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p 99142.
  • 33
    Bleed P. 2002. Obviously sequential, but continuous or staged? Cognitive basis of lithic technology in three late paleolithic assemblages from Japan. J Anthropol Archaeol 21: 329343.
  • 34
    Pianka E. 1978. Evolutionary Ecology, 2nd ed. New York: Harper and Row.
  • 35
    Hutchinson GE. 1957. Concluding remarks. Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. 22: 415427.
  • 36
    Odum EP. 1959. Fundamentals of ecology, 2nd ed. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders.
  • 37
    Uerpman H-P. 1996. Animal domestication: accident or intention? In: HarrisDR, editor. The origins and spread of agriculture and pastoral in Eurasia. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press. p 227237.
  • 38
    Pianka E. 1978. Evolutionary ecology, 2nd ed. New York: Harper and Row.
  • 39
    Odling-Smee FJ, Laland KN, Marcus MW. 2003. Niche construction: the neglected process in evolution. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • 40
    Laland KN, Odling-Smee FJ, Feldman M. 2001. Cultural niche construction and human evolution. J Evol Biol 14: 2222.
  • 41
    Speiss AE. 1979. Reindeer and caribou hunters: an archeological study. Academic Press: New York.
  • 42
    Weinstock J. 2002. Reindeer hunting in the upper paleolithic: sex ratios as a reflection of different procurement strategies. J Archaeol Sci 29: 365377.
  • 43
    Chard CS. 1955. Reindeer breeding: types and origins. Davidson J Anthropol 1: 7783.
  • 44
    Morey D. 1992. Size, shape and development in the evolution of the domestic dog. J Archaeol Sci 19: 181204.
  • 45
    Olson S. 1985. Origins of the domestic dog. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.
  • 46
    Vila C, Savolainen P, Maldanado J, Amorin I, Rice J, Honeycutt R, Crandall K, Lundeberg J, Wayne R. 1997. Multiple and ancient origins of the domestic dog. Science 276: 16871689.
  • 47
    Sablin M, Khlopachev G. 2002. The earliest ice age primitive dogs are found in the Russian Upper Paleolithic site Eliseevichi. Curr Anthropol 43: 795799.
  • 48
    Clutton-Brock J. 1999. A natural history of domesticated mammals. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • 49
    Budianski S. 2000. The truth about dogs: an inquiry into the ancestry, social conventions, mental habits, and moral fiber of Canis familiaris. New York: Viking.
  • 50
    Morey D. 1994. Early evolution of the domestic dog. Am Sci 82: 336347.
  • 51
    Trut LN. 1999. Early canid domestication: the farm-fox experiment. Am Sci 87: 160169.
  • 52
    Schleidt WM, Shalter MD. 2003. Co-evolution of humans and canids. Evol Cognition 9: 5772.
  • 53
    Cashdan EA. 1983. Territoriality among human foragers: ecological models and an application to four Bushman groups. Curr Anthropol 24: 4755, 62–66.
  • 54
    Leacock E. 1954. The Montagnais-Naskapi “hunting territory” and the fur trade. Washington: American Anthropological Association Memoir 78.
  • 55
    Pelto P. 1973. The snowmobile revolution: technology and social change in the Arctic. Menlo Park: Cummings.
  • 56
    Shirokogoroff SM. 1935. Psychomental complex of the Tungus. London: Kegan Paul
  • 57
    Alvard MS, Kuznar L. 2001. Deferred harvests: the transition from hunting to animal husbandry. Am Anthropol 103: 295311.