Speculations about the selective basis for modern human craniofacial form

Authors

  • Daniel E. Lieberman

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    1. Departments of Anthropology, and Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge MA, 02138, USA
    • Departments of Anthropology, and Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge MA, 02138, USA
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    • Daniel Lieberman is Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University. His research uses both comparative and experimental approaches to address why the human body looks the way it does. Particular interests include the origins of human craniofacial form and the evolution of bipedal walking and running. He is just completing a book, The Evolution of the Human Head (Harvard University Press).


Abstract

The last few decades have seen an explosion of knowledge about the time and place of origin of our species, Homo sapiens. New fossils, more sites, better dates, modern and fossil DNA, and scores of analyses have mostly disproved the multiregional model of human evolution. By and large, the evidence generally supports some version of the out-of-Africa model, according to which humans first evolved in Africa at least 200,000 years ago and then migrated to other parts of the world. Remaining debates about human origins primarily address if and how much hybridization occurred between modern humans and taxa of archaic Homo such as H. neanderthalensis.

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