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Sexual conflict in primates

Authors

  • Rebecca M. Stumpf,

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    • Rebecca M. Stumpf is an Associate Professor of Biological Anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign. Her research focuses on sexual conflict and sexual selection, more broadly. She incorporates behavioral, morphological, endocrinological and microbial analyses, field observations of wild primates, and comparative strategies (e.g., male vs. female, geographic, ontogenetic, and inter-specific comparisons) to better understand sexual selection in primates.

  • Rodolfo Martinez-Mota,

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    • Rodolfo Martinez-Mota, Nicoletta Righini, Krista M. Milich and Milena Shattuck are PhD candidates in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana- Champaign. Martinez-Mota is interested in the relationship between hormones and behavior, and infectious diseases in non-human primates. Righini is interested in studying dietary selectivity and the strategies employed by non-human primates to cope with the exploitation of difficult to digest resources by integrating nutritional, energetic, ecological, and behavioral data. Milich is interested in understanding the variation in primate reproductive behaviors, hormones, and ecology. Shattuck's research centers on understanding the evolution of the primate neuroendocrine system and its relationship to behavior.

  • Krista M. Milich,

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    • Rodolfo Martinez-Mota, Nicoletta Righini, Krista M. Milich and Milena Shattuck are PhD candidates in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana- Champaign. Martinez-Mota is interested in the relationship between hormones and behavior, and infectious diseases in non-human primates. Righini is interested in studying dietary selectivity and the strategies employed by non-human primates to cope with the exploitation of difficult to digest resources by integrating nutritional, energetic, ecological, and behavioral data. Milich is interested in understanding the variation in primate reproductive behaviors, hormones, and ecology. Shattuck's research centers on understanding the evolution of the primate neuroendocrine system and its relationship to behavior.

  • Nicoletta Righini,

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    • Rodolfo Martinez-Mota, Nicoletta Righini, Krista M. Milich and Milena Shattuck are PhD candidates in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana- Champaign. Martinez-Mota is interested in the relationship between hormones and behavior, and infectious diseases in non-human primates. Righini is interested in studying dietary selectivity and the strategies employed by non-human primates to cope with the exploitation of difficult to digest resources by integrating nutritional, energetic, ecological, and behavioral data. Milich is interested in understanding the variation in primate reproductive behaviors, hormones, and ecology. Shattuck's research centers on understanding the evolution of the primate neuroendocrine system and its relationship to behavior.

  • Milena R. Shattuck

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    • Rodolfo Martinez-Mota, Nicoletta Righini, Krista M. Milich and Milena Shattuck are PhD candidates in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana- Champaign. Martinez-Mota is interested in the relationship between hormones and behavior, and infectious diseases in non-human primates. Righini is interested in studying dietary selectivity and the strategies employed by non-human primates to cope with the exploitation of difficult to digest resources by integrating nutritional, energetic, ecological, and behavioral data. Milich is interested in understanding the variation in primate reproductive behaviors, hormones, and ecology. Shattuck's research centers on understanding the evolution of the primate neuroendocrine system and its relationship to behavior.


Abstract

Sexual conflict is increasingly recognized as a major force for evolutionary change and holds great potential for delineating variation in primate behavior and morphology. The goals of this review are to highlight the rapidly rising field of sexual conflict and the ongoing shift in our understanding of interactions between the sexes. We discuss the evidence for sexual conflict within the Order Primates, and assess how studies of primates have illuminated and can continue to increase our understanding of sexual conflict and sexual selection. Finally, we introduce a framework for understanding the behavioral, anatomical, and genetic expression of sexual conflict across primate mating systems and suggest directions for future research.

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