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Two-dimensional model of burning for pyrolyzable solids

Authors

  • Stanislav I. Stoliarov,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Fire Protection Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA
    • Correspondence to: Stanislav I. Stoliarov, University of Maryland, Department of Fire Protection Engineering, College Park, MD 20742, USA.

      E-mail: stolia@umd.edu

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  • Isaac T. Leventon,

    1. Department of Fire Protection Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA
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  • Richard E. Lyon

    1. FAA W. J. Hughes Technical Center, Airport and Aircraft Safety Research and Development Division, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ, USA
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  • This publication is a work of the US Government and is not subject to copyright protection.

ABSTRACT

Quantitative understanding of the processes that take place inside a burning material is critical for the prediction of ignition and growth of fires. To improve this understanding and enable predictive modeling, we developed a numerical pyrolysis solver called ThermaKin. This solver computes transient rate of gaseous fuel production from fundamental physical and chemical properties of constituents of a pyrolyzing solid. It was successfully applied to the simulation of combustion of a broad range of materials. One limitation of ThermaKin was that it could handle only one-dimensional burning problems. As a consequence, flame spread, which is an important contributor to fire growth, could not be simulated. Here, we present a new computational tool, ThermaKin2D, that expands ThermaKin model to two dimensions and combines it with a flexible analytical representation of a surface flame. It is our expectation that this tool will enable highly accurate simulations of flame spread dynamics. This manuscript contains a description of this new computation tool, reports results of a series of verification exercises, and demonstrates some of the ThermaKin2D's capabilities. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

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