Experimental study on ignition and combustion characteristics of typical oils

Authors

  • Xiao Chen,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
    2. Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
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  • Shouxiang Lu,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
    • Corresponding to: Shouxiang Lu, State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027, China.

      E-mail: sxlu@ustc.edu.cn

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  • Changhai Li,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
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  • Jiaqing Zhang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
    2. Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
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  • Kim Meow Liew

    1. Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
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ABSTRACT

The impact of radiant heat flux on ignition and combustion behavior of typical oils (diesel, lubricating oil, and aviation kerosene) was conducted in a cone calorimeter. A circular steel pan with a diameter of 10 cm was used to contain diesel, lubricating oil, and aviation kerosene without water sublayer. Using the standard oxygen consumption method, we obtained ignition time, heat release rate, mass loss rate, extinction coefficient, CO, and CO2 yield, and average specific extinction area was calculated from the extinction coefficient. Janssens' method was adopted in this study to deal with ignition time and radiant heat flux under a 0.55 power rule. Results show that the fitting through Janssens' method is good for ignition time of diesel, lubricating oil, and aviation kerosene and radiant heat flux. Moreover, heat release rate, mass loss rate, and CO/CO2 ratio appear to positively correlate with radiant heat flux, whereas average specific extinction area varies in a certain range. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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