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Food and Energy Security

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 3

December 2013

Volume 2, Issue 3

Pages i–i, 167–236

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Reviews
    4. Original Research
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      Issue Information (page i)

      Version of Record online: 17 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.42

  2. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Reviews
    4. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Food security: intensification of agriculture is essential, for which current tools must be defended and new sustainable technologies invented (pages 167–173)

      John A. Pickett

      Version of Record online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.32

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Picture is of a confined field trial at Rothamsted (2012), using a wheat variety genetically engineered to produce the aphid alarm pheromone. Food production must be intensified to use available and diminishing agricultural land most efficiently. To this end, current tools, including pesticides at the moment under threat without appropriate evidence, need to be defended. For the future, a more sustainable agricultural system, in terms of reduced seasonal inputs, must be researched and developed in which both crop protection and production inputs are delivered via seed, or other planting material, using breeding involving much wider crosses and particularly genetic modification (GM).

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Competing food concepts – Implications for Hawai'i, USA (pages 174–184)

      Matthew K. Loke and PingSun Leung

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.33

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      The article reviews and synthesizes competing food concepts specific to Hawaii. Food security impacts more people in more places than the other food concepts. Other food concepts have more narrow objectives, requiring higher societal cost.

  3. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Reviews
    4. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Designing high-yielding wheat ideotypes for a changing climate (pages 185–196)

      Mikhail A. Semenov and Pierre Stratonovitch

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.34

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      New wheat cultivars will be required for a rapidly changing environment putting severe pressure on breeders who should select for climate conditions which can only be predicted with a great degree of uncertainty. To assist breeders to identify key wheat traits for improvements under climate change, wheat ideotypes can be designed and tested in silico using a wheat simulation model for a wide range of future climate scenarios predicted by climate models.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Use of cereal crops for food and fuel – characterization of a novel bioethanol coproduct for use in meat poultry diets (pages 197–206)

      Emily J. Burton, Dawn V. Scholey and Peter E. V. Williams

      Version of Record online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.30

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A protein-rich, yeast fraction has been separated from the ethanol stillage. This study investigated its suitability as a protein source for poultry and compared its digestibility amino acid content with soya. The material appears a suitable feed source for poultry as a partial substitute for soya.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Energy intensity and global warming potential of corn grain ethanol production in Wisconsin (USA) (pages 207–219)

      Simone Kraatz, Julie C. Sinistore and Douglas J. Reinemann

      Version of Record online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.27

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      Increasing demand for renewable alternative fuels, such as ethanol, is driven by decreasing availability of fossil resources and increasing attention to climate change. The goals of this study are to enumerate the life cycle energy intensity (EI), net energy value and global warming potential (GWP) of corn grain ethanol production in Wisconsin (USA), to explore ethanol production scenarios which differ at the treatment of the whole stillage (WS) co-product and, to evaluate the various solutions to the multifunctionality problem which arises in LCA. From the comparison of both scenarios, we find that recycling the WS into electricity, heat and fertilizer is the most environmentally beneficial co-product use because it results in a 54% lower EI and a 49% lower GWP than the processing of WS into distiller dried grains with solubles.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Toward improved drought tolerance in bioenergy crops: QTL for carbon isotope composition and stomatal conductance in Populus (pages 220–236)

      Maud Viger, Maricela Rodriguez-Acosta, Anne M. Rae, James I. L. Morison and Gail Taylor

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.39

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      Dedicated non-food bioenergy crops like poplar are needed as sustainable, low-input feedstocks for renewable energy in a future drier climate, where they can be grown on marginal soils. We have assessed stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf carbon isotope composition (δ13C) in two Populus species, P. deltoides and P. trichocarpa and their F2 progeny, grown in the United Kingdom and in Italy. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for δ13C on eight linkage groups (LG) and two QTL for gs.

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