Instrumental and sensory aroma profile of pomegranate juices from the USA: differences between fresh and commercial juice

Authors

  • L. Vázquez-Araújo,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Sensory Analysis Center, Department of Human Nutrition, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-1407, USA
    • The Sensory Analysis Center, Department of Human Nutrition, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-1407, USA
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  • K. Koppel,

    1. Department of Food Processing, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia
    2. Competence Centre of Food and Fermentation Technologies, Tallinn, Estonia
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  • E. Chambers IV,

    1. The Sensory Analysis Center, Department of Human Nutrition, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-1407, USA
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  • K. Adhikari,

    1. The Sensory Analysis Center, Department of Human Nutrition, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-1407, USA
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  • A. A. Carbonell-Barrachina

    1. Departamento de Tecnología Agroalimentaria, Grupo Calidad y Seguridad Alimentaria, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03312-Orihuela, Alicante, Spain
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Abstract

Fourteen pomegranate juices (one fresh-squeezed and 13 commercial juices) were studied to determine the aromatic profile of the products. Headspace–solid phase micro-extraction and sensory flavour profile analysis were used to determine the aromatic composition of the juices and were related using partial least squares regression. Up to 83 different aromatic compounds were found in the juices, including terpenes, benzene derivatives, furans, esters, acids, ketones, alcohols and aldehydes. Commercial pomegranate juices did not present a unique sensory or instrumental aromatic profile. The three attributes common to the majority of the juices were an overall sweetness and musty/earthy and grape notes. This study shows the large heterogeneity of the pomegranate juices found on the market, which might be related to the fact that companies are looking for different successful pomegranate juice products using different raw ingredients and processes. Further studies are required to clarify what consumers are expecting in a typical ‘pomegranate juice’, and which aromatic profile could be successful in improving the acceptance of this healthy product. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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