Effect of roasting and autoclaving on phytic acid content of chickpea

Authors

  • B. Hussain,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Food Science and Technology, Nwfp Agricultural University, Peshawar, Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Human Nutrition, NWFP Agricultural University, Peshawar, and Nuclear Institute for Food and Agriculture, Tarnab, Peshawar, Pakistan
    • Department of Food Science and Technology, NWFP Agricultural University, Peshawar
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  • S. Khan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Food Science and Technology, Nwfp Agricultural University, Peshawar, Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Human Nutrition, NWFP Agricultural University, Peshawar, and Nuclear Institute for Food and Agriculture, Tarnab, Peshawar, Pakistan
    • Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Human Nutrition, NWFP Agricultural University, Peshawar
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  • M. Ismail,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Food Science and Technology, Nwfp Agricultural University, Peshawar, Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Human Nutrition, NWFP Agricultural University, Peshawar, and Nuclear Institute for Food and Agriculture, Tarnab, Peshawar, Pakistan
    • Department of Food Science and Technology, NWFP Agricultural University, Peshawar
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  • A. Sattar

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Food Science and Technology, Nwfp Agricultural University, Peshawar, Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Human Nutrition, NWFP Agricultural University, Peshawar, and Nuclear Institute for Food and Agriculture, Tarnab, Peshawar, Pakistan
    • Nuclear Institute for Food and Agriculture, Tarnab, Peshawar, Pakistan
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Abstract

Chickpea cultivars CM-68, (2-44, Kabuli, CM-72 and 6153 were analysed for phytic acid, phytate phosphorus and total phosphorus. The effect of roasting and autoclaving on these constituents of whole seed and cotyledons was determined. The data revealed that roasting and autoclaving significantly decreased (P i 0.05) the phytic acid of chickpea cultivars. Phytic acid of whole seed was reduced to a range value of 16-60% and 16-64% by roasting and autoclaving respectively depending upon the cultivar. In the cotyledon, the phytic acid was reduced to a range value of 32-68 % and 18-68 % during roasting and autoclaving respectively. Similar effect of these treatments was observed in phytate phosphorus however, total phosphorus was little affected.

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