Effects of processing on the proximate and metal contents in three fish species from Nigerian coastal waters

Authors

  • Francisca I. Bassey,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross-Rivers State, Nigeria
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  • Fehintola C. Oguntunde,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross-Rivers State, Nigeria
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  • Chukwujindu M. A. Iwegbue,

    Corresponding author
    1. Metals and Trace Organics Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Delta state University, Abraka, Nigeria
    2. School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
    • Correspondence

      Chukwujindu M. A. Iwegbue, Metals and Trace Organics Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Delta state University, P.M.B. 1, Abraka, Nigeria. Tel: +23408033864109; E-mail: maxipriestley@yahoo.com

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  • Vincent N. Osabor,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross-Rivers State, Nigeria
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  • Christopher A. Edem

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross-Rivers State, Nigeria
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Abstract

The effects of culinary practices such as boiling, frying, and grilling on the proximate compositions and concentrations of metals (Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Hg) in commonly consumed fish species from the Nigerian coastal waters were investigated. The selected fish species were Polydactylus quadratifilis, Chrysicthys nigrodigitatus and Cynoglossus senegalensis. The culinary practices lead to increased protein, fat, and ash contents and decreased moisture contents of these fish species. The culinary practices resulted significant increase in the concentrations of most of the studied metals and decrease in the concentrations of Fe, Cr, and Pb in some fish types. The concentrations and estimated dietary intakes of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Hg from consumption of the processed fish were within their statutory safe limits. The individual metal target hazard quotient (THQ) values and the total THQs were less than 1 which indicates that no health risks would arise from the long-term consumption of these fish species.

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