The inhibitory effect of a fermented papaya preparation on growth, hydrophobicity, and acid production of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Lactobacillus acidophilus: its implications in oral health improvement of diabetics

Authors

  • Jhoti Somanah,

    1. ANDI Center for Biomedical and Biomaterials Research, University of Mauritius, Mauritius, Republic of Mauritius
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  • Emmanuel Bourdon,

    1. Groupe d'Etude sur l'Inflammation Chronique et l'Obésité, Université de La Réunion, Saint Denis, France
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  • Theeshan Bahorun,

    Corresponding author
    1. ANDI Center for Biomedical and Biomaterials Research, University of Mauritius, Mauritius, Republic of Mauritius
    • Correspondence

      Okezie I. Aruoma, School of Pharmacy, American University of Health Sciences, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Tel: +1 562 988 2278;

      E-mail: oaruoma@auhs.edu

      Theeshan Bahorun, ANDI Center for Biomedical and Biomaterials Research, MSIRI Building, University of Mauritius, Réduit, Republic of Mauritius.

      Tel/Fax: +230 4675582;

      E-mail: tbahorun@uom.ac.mu

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  • Okezie I. Aruoma

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Pharmacy, American University of Health Sciences, Signal Hill, California 90755, USA
    • Correspondence

      Okezie I. Aruoma, School of Pharmacy, American University of Health Sciences, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Tel: +1 562 988 2278;

      E-mail: oaruoma@auhs.edu

      Theeshan Bahorun, ANDI Center for Biomedical and Biomaterials Research, MSIRI Building, University of Mauritius, Réduit, Republic of Mauritius.

      Tel/Fax: +230 4675582;

      E-mail: tbahorun@uom.ac.mu

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Fermented papaya preparation (FPP) is a “natural health product.” The high incidence of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral microbial infection cases among patients with diabetes mellitus continues to prevail. The potential role of FPP against common oral microbiota (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) isolated from the human oral cavity was investigated using in vitro simulation models of dental plaque and caries. FPP showed an inhibitory effect against the growth (at 0.05 mg/mL: S. mutans: −6.9%; S. mitis: −4.47%, < 0.05), acid production (at 0.05 mg/mL: S. mutans: +6.38%; L. acidophilus: +2.25%), and hydrophobicity (at 50 mg/mL: S. mutans: 1.01%, < 0.01; S. mitis: 7.66%, < 0.05) of tested microbiota. The results of this study suggest that low doses of FPP may be a suitable complement to good oral hygiene practice for the effective prevention of dental caries, plaque, and gingivitis. The functional application of FPP as a constituent of a balanced diet and active lifestyle can make a positive contribution to the oral health status and well-being of patients with diabetes.

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