Global Biogeochemical Cycles

Cover image for Global Biogeochemical Cycles

March 2014

Volume 28, Issue 3

Pages i–iii, 181–333

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    1. Issue Information (pages i–iii)

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/gbc.20083

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    1. Global assessment of ocean carbon export by combining satellite observations and food-web models (pages 181–196)

      D. A. Siegel, K. O. Buesseler, S. C. Doney, S. F. Sailley, M. J. Behrenfeld and P. W. Boyd

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004743

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      Key Points

      • Global ocean carbon export is assessed using satellite observations
      • Reproduces field observations and predicts sensible patterns in export efficiency
      • Decadal-scale trends are found in global export efficiency
    2. CO2 and CH4 emissions from streams in a lake-rich landscape: Patterns, controls, and regional significance (pages 197–210)

      John T. Crawford, Noah R. Lottig, Emily H. Stanley, John F. Walker, Paul C. Hanson, Jacques C. Finlay and Robert G. Striegl

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004661

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      Key Points

      • Stream emissions nearly equal lake emissions
      • Groundwater and stream metabolism support CO2 flux
      • Lakes do not significantly affect stream gases
    3. Evaluating soil biogeochemistry parameterizations in Earth system models with observations (pages 211–222)

      William R. Wieder, Jennifer Boehnert and Gordon B. Bonan

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004665

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      Key Points

      • SOC estimates from ESMs show wide variation and are exceptionally low in CLM4cn
      • After modifications DAYCENT parameterizations provide more realistic SOC pools
      • SOC responses to warming suggest further evaluation of models are warranted
    4. Incorporating microbial ecology concepts into global soil mineralization models to improve predictions of carbon and nitrogen fluxes (pages 223–238)

      Yuki Fujita, Jan-Philip M. Witte and Peter M. van Bodegom

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004595

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      Key Points

      • We modeled soil C and N flux with various microbial parameters and structures
      • Mineralization rates were validated with lab incubation data from diverse soils
      • Inclusion of microbial biomass and C:N stoichiometry improves global models
    5. The role of soil processes in δ18O terrestrial climate proxies (pages 239–252)

      Lisa C. Kanner, Nikolaus H. Buenning, Lowell D. Stott, Axel Timmermann and David Noone

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004742

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      Key Points

      • Ground evaporation can significantly influence xylem water isotope variability
      • Upward fluxes of isotopically depleted soil water occur during dry intervals
      • Isotopically low years in climate proxies may indicate dry, not wet, intervals
    6. Introducing a terrestrial carbon pool in warm desert bedrock mountains, southwestern USA (pages 253–268)

      Emma J. Harrison and Ronald I. Dorn

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004568

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      Key Points

      • Desert bedrock fractures contain substantial amounts of carbonate
      • The upper 2 m of analyzed exposures host about 0.079 mTC per square meter
      • Pilot data suggest an asymmetric rhythm of storage and release of this carbon
    7. Factors influencing export of dissolved inorganic nitrogen by major rivers: A new, seasonal, spatially explicit, global model (pages 269–285)

      Michelle L. McCrackin, John A. Harrison and Jana E. Compton

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004723

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      Key Points

      • Catchment DIN attenuation is greater in summer compared to other seasons
      • Both runoff and temperature influence seasonal DIN-transport efficiency
      • Depending on season and latitude, 3-10% of TN inputs are exported as DIN
    8. Potential future dynamics of carbon fluxes and pools in New England forests and their climatic sensitivities: A model-based study (pages 286–299)

      Guoping Tang, Brian Beckage and Benjamin Smith

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004656

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      Key Points

      • Carbon sequestration in New England forests
      • Complexity of climatic sensitivities of carbon dynamics
      • Future potential carbon dynamics
    9. The fate of terrigenous dissolved organic carbon in a river-influenced ocean margin (pages 300–318)

      Cédric G. Fichot and Ronald Benner

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004670

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      Key Points

      • About 1 Tg of terrigenous DOC is mineralized on the Louisiana shelf annually
      • Mineralization of terrigenous DOC is 2.5 times higher in summer than winter
      • Biomineralization is the dominant mineralization process for terrigenous DOC
    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Soil organic carbon sequestration in upland soils of northern China under variable fertilizer management and climate change scenarios (pages 319–333)

      Guiying Jiang, Minggang Xu, Xinhua He, Wenju Zhang, Shaomin Huang, Xueyun Yang, Hua Liu, Chang Peng, Yasuhito Shirato, Toshichika Iizumi, Jinzhou Wang and Daniel V. Murphy

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004746

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      Key Points

      • The RothC model is suitable for SOC simulation in upland soil in Northern China
      • The climate change did not significantly affect annual rate of SOC change
      • Inorganic fertilizer intensive farming need organic carbon inputs for SOC kept

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