The first functional study of MLH3 mutations found in cancer patients

Authors

  • Mari K. Korhonen,

    1. Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Genetics, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
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  • Elina Vuorenmaa,

    1. Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Genetics, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
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  • Minna Nyström

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Genetics, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
    • Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Genetics, University of Helsinki, Viikinkaari 5, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
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Abstract

The MLH3 gene is one of the five mismatch repair (MMR) genes associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Eighteen different inherited MLH3 mutations have been reported as pathogenic in an international mutation database. In several cases, a mutation was found in a patient without a family history suggestive of inherited cancer susceptibility. In some cases, a similar mutation was also found in sporadic patients and/or healthy controls. Four patients carried an MLH3 mutation together with another inherited MMR gene variation. No functional analyses have been performed to assess the pathogenicity of these 18 mutations. MLH3 has been assumed to be less important in MMR than the other HNPCC susceptibility genes MSH2, MSH6, MLH1, and PMS2, and accordingly a low-risk gene for colorectal cancer (CRC). To assess the significance of the inherited sequence variations in MLH3, we functionally characterized seven missense mutations (Q24E, R647C, S817G, G933C, W1276R, A1394T, E1451K) scattered throughout the MLH3 polypeptide. The mutations were found in CRC or endometrial cancer patients and reported as pathogenic. Our study showed that the seven mutated MLH3 proteins, in complex with their counterpart MLH1 (MutLγ), repaired mismatches as the wild type MutLγ but worse than a heterodimer of MLH1 and PMS2 (MutLα). The results confirm that MutLγ is a less efficient MMR complex than MutLα and show that the MLH3 mutations alone do not interfere with MMR. Further studies are needed to evaluate the pathogenicity of MLH3 mutations in compound with other MMR mutations. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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