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Nuclear remodeling of telomeres in chronic myeloid leukemia

Authors

  • Oumar Samassekou,

    1. Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada
    2. Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
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  • Josée Hébert,

    1. Leukemia Cell Bank of Quebec and Division of Hematology, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada
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  • Sabine Mai,

    Corresponding author
    1. Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    • Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3E 0V9
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  • Ju Yan

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada
    • Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Ave N, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1H 5N4
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Abstract

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematologic cancer characterized by the proliferation of myeloid cells and the translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, [t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2)]. At the chronic phase (CP), CML cells present longer telomeres than at the other clinical phases, display arm-specific maintenance of individual telomere lengths, and are chromosomally stable. We asked whether an alteration of nuclear organization of telomeres, which is associated with genomic instability, occurs in CML cells at the CP. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization of telomeres combined with three-dimensional (3D) quantification to study the nuclear telomeric architecture of CML cells at the CP. We found that cells can exhibit high telomere numbers, different telomere distributions, and alterations in peripheral or central nuclear location of telomeres. Also, we show that CML cells can be categorized in two groups according to the number of their telomere aggregates (TAs). We propose that the presence of high TAs in some samples is associated with the increased genomic instability and could be an indication of the clinical transitional phase. Also, alterations of nuclear organization of telomeres at the CP confirm that nuclear remodeling of telomeres can occur at an early clinical stage of a cancer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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