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Stab wound injury of the zebrafish telencephalon: A model for comparative analysis of reactive gliosis

Authors

  • Emily Violette Baumgart,

    1. Institute for Stem Cell Research, Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany
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  • Joana S. Barbosa,

    1. Institute for Stem Cell Research, Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany
    2. PhD Programme in Biomedicine and Experimental Biology (BEB), Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
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  • Laure Bally-cuif,

    1. Zebrafish Neurogenetics Group, Laboratory of Neurobiology and Development (N&D), CNRS UPR 3294, Institute of Neurobiology Alfred Fessard, Gif-sur-Yvette cédex, France
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  • Magdalena Götz,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Stem Cell Research, Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany
    2. Department of Physiological Genomics, Institute of Physiology, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Munich, Germany
    • Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Institute of Stem Cell Research, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
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  • Jovica Ninkovic

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Stem Cell Research, Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany
    2. Department of Physiological Genomics, Institute of Physiology, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Munich, Germany
    • Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Institute of Stem Cell Research, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
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  • Note added in Proof: Note the difference in glial cell reactivity when stab wound injury is performed through the skull (as recently published in März et al., 2011; Kishimoto et al., 2012) versus injury via the nostrils (this paper, and the recently published work by Kroehne et al., 2011, where injury affects almost half of the telencephalic hemisphere). Injuries through the skull damage the VZ and allow CSF entry into the brain parenchyma, which may account for the observed differences.

Abstract

Reactive glia, including astroglia and oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPCs) are at the core of the reaction to injury in the mammalian brain with initially beneficial and later partially adverse functions such as scar formation. Given the different glial composition in the adult zebrafish brain with radial ependymoglia but no parenchymal astrocytes, we examined the glial response to an invasive stab wound injury model in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. Strikingly, already a few days after injury the wound was closed without any scar tissue. Similar to mammals, microglia cells reacted first and accumulated close to the injury site, while neither GFAP+ radial ependymoglia nor adult OPCs were recruited to the injury site. Moreover, OPCs failed to increase their proliferation after this injury, while the number of proliferating GFAP+ glia was increased until 7 days after injury. Importantly, neurogenesis was also increased after injury, generating additional neurons recruited to the parenchyma which survived for several months. Thus, these data suggest that the specific glial environment in the adult zebrafish telencephalon is not only permissive for long-term neuronal survival, but avoids scar formation. Invasive injury in the adult zebrafish telencephalon may therefore provide a useful model to untangle the molecular mechanisms involved in these beneficial glial reactions. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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