Extensive regenerative plasticity among adult NG2-glia populations is exclusively based on self-renewal

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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum: Extensive regenerative plasticity among adult NG2-glia populations is exclusively based on self-renewal Volume 62, Issue 1, 158, Article first published online: 8 November 2013

Address correspondence to Maia V. Kokoeva, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Royal Victoria Hospital, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC H3A 1A1, Canada. E-mail: maia.kokoeva@mcgill.ca

Abstract

NG2-glia are known to proliferate in the adult brain, however the extent of their mitotic and regenerative capacity and particularly their adult origin is uncertain. By employing a paradigm of mitotic blockade in conjunction with genetic fate tracing we demonstrate that intracerebroventricular mitotic blocker infusion leads to wide-spread and complete ablation of NG2-glial cells in the hypothalamus and other periventricular brain regions. However, despite the extensive glia loss, parenchymal NG2-glia coverage is fully restored to pretreatment levels within two weeks. We further reveal that in response to mitotic blocker treatment, NG2-glia bordering the ablated territories start to express the stem cell marker nestin, divide and migrate to replace the lost cells. Importantly, the migration front of repopulating NG2-glia invariably proceeds from the distal parenchyma towards the ventricles, ruling out contributions of the subventricular zone neurogenic niche or the corresponding area of the third ventricle as source of new NG2-glia. NG2-CreER-based fate tracing further substantiates that NG2-glia which have been spared from mitotic blockade are the sole source of regenerating NG2-glia. Collectively, our data reveals that all adult NG2-glia retain the ability to divide and that they are capable of fully restoring parenchymal NG2-glia coverage after wide-spread NG2 cell loss, indicating complete self-sufficiency in maintaining NG2-glia population levels in the adult brain. GLIA 2013;61:1735–1747

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