Psychometric properties and factor structure of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Nursing Home version in an elderly neuropsychiatric population

Authors

  • Rael T. Lange,

    Corresponding author
    1. Riverview Hospital, Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada
    • Riverview Hospital, Neuropsychiatry & Neuropsychology Program, North Lawn, 500 Lougheed Highway, Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, V3C 4J2, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Grace A. Hopp,

    1. Keywest Psychology Services, Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada
    2. University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nirmal Kang

    1. Riverview Hospital, Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada
    2. University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

The Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) is an interview-based instrument designed to elicit information from an informal caregiver to evaluate behavioral disturbances in persons with dementia. Minor modifications of this instrument have produced the Neuropsychiatric Inventory—Nursing Home version (NPI-NH), a version specifically designed for interviewing professional care facility staff. The purpose of this investigation is to further understand the psychometric properties of the NPI-NH by examining its reliability, validity, and factor structure in an elderly neuropsychiatric population.

Method

Participants were 204 elderly inpatients from a large provincial neuropsychiatric hospital in British Columbia, Canada. Data were collected as part of a patient needs assessment project.

Results

The internal consistency reliability of the NPI-NH was α=0.67. An exploratory principal axis analysis with varimax rotation revealed five factors that accounted for 63.2% of the variance. These factors reflect aspects of psychiatric disturbance associated with: (a) Agitation; (b) Mood; (c) Psychosis; (d) Sleep/Motor Activity; and (e) Elevated Behavior. Convergent and discriminant validity of the five factors by correlating them with other behavioral measures was considered satisfactory.

Conclusions

These results provide support for the clinical use of the NPI-NH as a screen for neuropsychiatric symptoms in an elderly neuropsychiatric population. However, additional research is encouraged to further evaluate the clinical utility of the NPI-NH in nursing home and inpatient geriatric settings. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Ancillary