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The AddNeuroMed framework for multi-centre MRI assessment of Alzheimer's disease : experience from the first 24 months

Authors

  • Andrew Simmons,

    Corresponding author
    1. NIHR Specialist Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, London, UK
    2. MRC Centre for Neurodegeneration, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK
    3. Centre for Neuroimaging Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
    • NIHR Specialist Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, London, UK.
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    • Joint first authors.

  • Eric Westman,

    1. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Section of Clinical Geriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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    • Joint first authors.

  • Sebastian Muehlboeck,

    1. Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
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  • Patrizia Mecocci,

    1. Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
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  • Bruno Vellas,

    1. Toulouse Gerontopole University Hospital, Univeriste Paul Sabatier, INSERM U 558, France
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  • Magda Tsolaki,

    1. Department of Neurology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
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  • Iwona Kłoszewska,

    1. Department of Old Age Psychiatry and Psychotic Disorders, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
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  • Lars-Olof Wahlund,

    1. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Section of Clinical Geriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Hilkka Soininen,

    1. Department of Neurology, University and University Hospital of Kuopio, Finland
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  • Simon Lovestone,

    1. NIHR Specialist Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, London, UK
    2. MRC Centre for Neurodegeneration, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK
    3. Centre for Neuroimaging Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK
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  • Alan Evans,

    1. Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
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  • Christian Spenger

    1. Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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Abstract

Objective

To describe the AddNeuroMed imaging framework for multi-centre magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of longitudinal changes in Alzheimer's disease and report on early results from the first 24 months of the project.

Methods

A multi-centre study similarly to a faux clinical trial has been established to assess longitudinal MRI changes in Alzheimer disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy control subjects using an image acquisition protocol compatible with Alzheimer disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI). Comprehensive quality control (QC) measures have been established throughout the study. An intelligent web-accessible database holds details on both the raw images and data processed using a sophisticated image analysis pipeline.

Results

A total of 378 subjects have been recruited (130 AD, 131 MCI, 117 healthy controls) of which a high percentage (97.3%) of the T1-weighted volumes passed the QC criteria. Measurements of normalized whole brain volume and whole brain cortical thickness showed significant differences between AD and controls, AD and MCI and MCI and controls.

Conclusions

A framework for multi-centre MRI studies of Alzheimer's disease has been established consisting of a harmonized MRI acquisition protocol across centres, rigorous QC at both the sites and central data analysis hub and an automated image analysis pipeline. Early results demonstrate the high quality of the images acquired and the applicability of the automated image analysis techniques employed. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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