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Keywords:

  • caregiving;
  • adult day care;
  • Alzheimer's disease;
  • respite;
  • community-based care;
  • adult day services;
  • informal caregiving;
  • family caregiving

Abstract

Background

The objective of this study was to determine whether adult day service use interacts with decreases in primary caregiving hours (i.e. the time caregivers spent on activities of daily living/instrumental activities of daily living, memory problems, and behavior problems for patients) to alleviate caregiver stress and negative mental health over time.

Methods

Three-month longitudinal data from the Adult Day Care Collaborative Study (n=400) were used.

Results

Decreases in memory problem hours among adult day service users were associated with reduced feelings of role overload; decreases in ADL hours among non-users were associated with decreases in worry and strain over a three-month period.

Conclusion

The findings suggest that adult day services are potentially effective in restructuring caregiving time and providing respite to family members. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.