Geophysical Research Letters

A TEX86 lake record suggests simultaneous shifts in temperature in Central Europe and Greenland during the last deglaciation

Authors

  • Cornelia I. Blaga,

    1. Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gert-Jan Reichart,

    1. Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Netherlands
    2. Department of Marine Organic Biogeochemistry, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • André F. Lotter,

    1. Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Flavio S. Anselmetti,

    1. Department of Surface Waters, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science & Technology, Switzerland
    2. Now at Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
    Current affiliation:
    1. Now at Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Netherlands
    • Department of Marine Organic Biogeochemistry, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author

Corresponding author: J. S. Sinninghe Damsté, Department of Marine Organic Biogeochemistry, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, PO Box 59, 1790AB Den Burg, Netherlands. (jaap.damste@nioz.nl)

Abstract

[1] High-resolution quantitative temperature records from continents covering glacial to interglacial transitions are scarce but important for understanding the climate system. We present the first decadal resolution record of continental temperatures in Central Europe during the last deglaciation (~14,600–10,600 cal. yr B.P.) based on the organic geochemical palaeothermometer TEX86. The TEX86-inferred temperature record from Lake Lucerne (Vierwaldstättersee, Switzerland) reveals typical oscillations during the Late Glacial Interstadial, followed by an abrupt cooling of 2°C at the onset of Younger Dryas and a rapid warming of 4°C at the onset of the Holocene, within less than 350 years. The remarkable resemblance with the Greenland and regional stable oxygen isotope records suggests that temperature changes in continental Europe were dominated by large-scale reorganizations in the northern hemispheric climate system.

Ancillary