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HOOHModelSupplementalMaterials_v16.docxWord 2007 document51KSupporting Information
FigS1_HourlySnowfall.pdfPDF document26KEstimated seasonal variation in snowfall rate assuming maximum snowfall on 21 July (based on data of Bromwich et al. [1993]) for examining the sensitivity of HOOH concentrations on snowfall timing. For most scenarios (i.e., in our baseline condition), the snowfall rate was assumed constant at 5 cm month–1 (0.0069 cm h–1) throughout the year; see text for details.
FigS2_AverageDailyTemp.pdfPDF document31KAverage daily temperature at Summit, Greenland, using hourly data collected from 1996 through 2011 [Steffen et al., 1996]. We calculated the average of all valid data points for each day.
FigS3_MonthlyAverageTempAndRange.pdfPDF document22KMonthly average temperature (with error bars showing ±0.5 times the monthly average range) at Summit, Greenland, using hourly data collected from 1996 through 2011 [Steffen et al., 1996]. We calculated the monthly average temperature using all data available for each month. We determined the monthly range by first subtracting the low temperature from the high temperature for each day to give a range for each day of the month. We then averaged the daily ranges to get the monthly average range. The average monthly range is shown by the entire bar length in the figure, with the average monthly temperature in the center of the bar.
FigS4_DielTempVariationAtDepth.pdfPDF document46KImpact of the diel surface temperature variation (15°C) at various snow depths, showing deviation from the average surface temperature. Snowpack temperature variation decreases with depth and also shows a time lag relative to surface temperature variation.
FigS5_YearlyTemperatureVariationAtDepth.pdfPDF document83KImpact of yearly surface temperature variation (27°C) at various snow depths, showing deviation from the average surface temperature. Compared to the diel temperature variation (Figure S3), annual temperature variations are noticeable at greater depths and with a larger time lag.
FigS6_ModeledSnowpackTemp.pdfPDF document24KModeled snowpack temperature in our snow parcel deposited on 21 June for the first year of the simulation. We modeled snowpack temperature assuming a sinusoidal surface temperature variation of 27°C and a snowfall rate of 5 cm month−1. Note that the modeled temperature after 1 year (z = 60 cm) does not equal the starting temperature (z = 0 cm) due to the impact of snowfall.
FigS7_PhiOverTime.pdfPDF document27KCalculated Φ values (for the case of Φ258 = 0.19) in the snow parcel for the first year of the simulation, where the parcel moves from z = 0 cm to z = 60 cm. Φ is a function of temperature and follows the temperature pattern shown in Figure S6.
FigS8_SeasonalVariationOfActinicFlux.pdfPDF document26KSeasonal variation of hourly actinic flux at the snow surface. Actinic fluxes shown are the total flux between 240 and 380 nm at each hour. As described in the text, we calculated hourly actinic fluxes using the TUV model for each week of the simulation. Week 1 begins on 21 June.
FigS9_InitialConcentration.pdfPDF document33KSensitivity of modeled HOOH concentrations in the snow parcel to the initial HOOH concentration. Snow is deposited on 21 June and modeled using baseline conditions [Φ258 = 0.19, RE = 0.10, and Rf(HOOH)0 = 5.3 nM h−1]. The percentages of initially deposited HOOH that are preserved after 6 months are 48%, 51%, 59%, and 77% for initial concentrations of 30, 20, 10, and 5 μM, respectively.
HOOHModelSupplementalMaterialsREADME.txtplain text document4KSupporting Information

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