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Keywords:

  • geodynamics

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[1] In the paper “Geodynamic models of Archean continental collision and the formation of mantle lithosphere keels” by R. Gray and R. N. Pysklywec (Geophysical Research Letters, 37, L19301, doi:10.1029/2010GL043965, 2010), the caption of Figure 2 should be changed to “Evolution of the thermo-mechanical models with varying crustal compositions and RHP = 4.2 × 10−10W/kg (1.7× that of today, [Mareschal and Jaupart, 2006]). We assign all the heat-producing elements to the felsic portions of the crust. Inset frames show filled contours of plate-like (log(ηeff.) ≥ 23) material. Material with log (ηeff.) < 23 is omitted from the plot (white regions). Viscous flow law of inline imageexp(inline image) is used, where inline image is the strain rate, σ is the differential stress, and T is the temperature. Variables A, n, and Q are material parameter, power exponent, and activation energy, respectively. In Run1 (frame A), A = 1.1 × 10−28Pa−4/s, n = 4, and Q = 535 kJ/mol are used for the crust, based on wet quartzite [Gleason and Tullis, 1995]. For Run2 (frame B), A = 7.96 × 10−25Pa−3.4/s, n = 3.4, and Q = 260 kJ/mol are used for the upper crust, based on diabase [Ranalli, 1997]; A = 2.01 × 10−25Pa−3.1/s, n = 3.1, and Q = 243 kJ/mol are used for the lower crust, based on felsic granulite [Ranalli, 1997]. For Run3 (frame C), A = 1.13 × 10−28Pa−3.2/s, n = 3.2, and Q = 123 kJ/mol are used for the upper crust, based on granite [Ranalli, 1997]; A = 8.83 × 10−22Pa−4.2/s, n = 4.2, and Q = 445 kJ/mol are used for the lower crust, based on mafic granulite [Ranalli, 1997]. In all models, A = 5.49 × 10−25Pa−4.48/s, n = 4.48, and Q = 498 kJ/mol are used for the mantle, based on wet olivine [Chopra and Paterson, 1984]. Strength of the mantle lithosphere is increased by a factor of 140 [Hirth and Kohlstedt, 1996] to represent dry olivine. Due to computational limitations, viscosity range of 5 × 1019 to 1027Pa·s is imposed in experiments, thus ignoring the effects of partial melting. In all the models, the crust has angle of internal friction φeff = 15°, whereas the lower crust and mantle are permitted to strain weaken to 2°, over range of accumulated strain, inline image [e.g., Pysklywec et al., 2002].”

References

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  2. 1
  3. References
  • Chopra, P. N., and M. S. Paterson (1984), The role of water in the deformation of dunite, J. Geophys. Res., 89, 78617876.
  • Gleason, G. C., and J. Tullis (1995), A flow law for dislocation creep of quartz aggregates determined with the molten salt cell, Tectonophysics, 247, 123.
  • Hirth, G., and D. L. Kohlstedt (1996), Water in the oceanic upper mantle: Implications for rheology, melt extraction and the evolution of the lithosphere, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 144, 93108.
  • Mareschal, J. C., and C. Jaupart (2006), Archean thermal regime and stabilization of the cratons, in Archean Geodynamics and Environments, Geophys. Monogr. Ser., vol. 164, edited by J.-C. Mareschal, K. Benn, and K. C. Condie, pp. 6174, AGU, Washington, D. C.
  • Pysklywec, R. N., C. Beaumont, and P. Fullsack (2002), Lithospheric deformation during the early stages of continental collision: Numerical experiments and comparison with South Island, New Zealand, J. Geophys. Res., 107(B7), 2133, 119, doi:10.1029/2001JB000252.
  • Ranalli, G. (1997), Rheology of the lithosphere in space and time, in Orogeny Through Time, edited by J.-P. Burg, and M. Ford, Geol. Soc. Spec. Publ., 121, 1937.