Magma dynamics feeding Yasur's explosive activity observed using thermal infrared remote sensing

Authors

  • Philipson Bani,

    Corresponding author
    1. Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    2. CNRS, UMR 6524, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    3. IRD, R 163, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    4. Center for Volcanology and Geohazards Mitigations, Bandung, Indonesia
    • Corresponding author: P. Bani, IRD, R 163, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, 5 rue Kessler, FR-63038 Clermont-Ferrand, France. (philipson.bani@ird.fr)

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  • Andrew J. L. Harris,

    1. Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    2. CNRS, UMR 6524, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    3. IRD, R 163, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Clermont-Ferrand, France
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  • Hiroshi Shinohara,

    1. Geological Survey of Japan, AIST, Tsukuba, Japan
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  • Franck Donnadieu

    1. Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    2. CNRS, UMR 6524, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Clermont-Ferrand, France
    3. IRD, R 163, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Clermont-Ferrand, France
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Abstract

[1] A thermal infrared thermometer was used to record the passage of hot gases and fragments across a measurement area located at the exit of one of Yasur's active vents. Recording was completed over 2 h during September 2011. A total of 200 explosive events were recorded. We define two types of event: low-energy events with typical thermal energies of 14 kJ and high-energy events with typical thermal energies of 97 kJ. Around 180 low-energy events were recorded, which together released 457 kJ of radiant energy. In contrast, only 20 high-energy events were recorded, but they released 2042 kJ. We suggest that low-energy events originate from a relatively shallow, degassed magma reservoir and are associated with bursting of bubbles formed by bubble coalescence during ascent. Instead, high-energy events originate from a relatively deep, fresh magma reservoir and are associated with slugs formed by foam collapse.

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