Geophysical Research Letters

Revisiting the evidence linking Arctic amplification to extreme weather in midlatitudes

Authors


Corresponding author: E. A. Barnes, Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. (eabarnes@atmos.colostate.edu)

Abstract

[1] Previous studies have suggested that Arctic amplification has caused planetary-scale waves to elongate meridionally and slow down, resulting in more frequent blocking patterns and extreme weather. Here trends in the meridional extent of atmospheric waves over North America and the North Atlantic are investigated in three reanalyses, and it is demonstrated that previously reported positive trends are likely an artifact of the methodology. No significant decrease in planetary-scale wave phase speeds are found except in October-November-December, but this trend is sensitive to the analysis parameters. Moreover, the frequency of blocking occurrence exhibits no significant increase in any season in any of the three reanalyses, further supporting the lack of trends in wave speed and meridional extent. This work highlights that observed trends in midlatitude weather patterns are complex and likely not simply understood in terms of Arctic amplification alone.

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