Individual variation in neural correlates of sadness in children: A twin fMRI study

Authors

  • Catherine Côté,

    1. Program in Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
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  • Mario Beauregard,

    1. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Centre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie Expérimentale et Cognition (CERNEC), Department of Psychology, Centre de Recherche en Sciences Neurologiques (CRSN), Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada, and Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal (CRIUGM), Montreal, Canada
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  • Alain Girard,

    1. Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
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  • Boualem Mensour,

    1. Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM), Notre-Dame Hospital, Montreal, Canada
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  • Adham Mancini-Marïe,

    1. Program in Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada, and Fernand-Seguin Research Center, Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital, Montreal, Canada
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  • Daniel Pérusse

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and Centre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie Expérimentale et Cognition (CERNEC), Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada, and Ste. Justine Hospital Research Centre, Ste. Justine Hospital, Montreal, Canada
    • C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7
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Abstract

Functional neuroimaging studies show substantial individual variation in brain activation accompanying the experience of emotion, including sadness. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 104 pairs of 8-year-old twins (47 MZ, 57 DZ) to assess genetic-environmental contributions to individual differences in neural activation in two prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas previously shown to be involved in sadness. No genetic effects were found for any area, individual environmental factors entirely accounting for individual variation in brain activation related to sadness. Sadness being the prevailing mood in depression, these findings may be of relevance to the etiology of childhood depressive disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 2007. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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