Linear and curvilinear correlations of brain white matter volume, fractional anisotropy, and mean diffusivity with age using voxel-based and region-of-interest analyses in 246 healthy children

Authors

  • Yasuyuki Taki,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
    • Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging & Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryocho, Aobaku, 980-8575 Sendai, Japan
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  • Benjamin Thyreau,

    1. Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Hiroshi Hashizume,

    1. Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Yuko Sassa,

    1. Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Hikaru Takeuchi,

    1. Smart Ageing International Research Centre, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Kai Wu,

    1. Department of Nuclear Medicine & Radiology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Yuka Kotozaki,

    1. Smart Ageing International Research Centre, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Rui Nouchi,

    1. Smart Ageing International Research Centre, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Michiko Asano,

    1. Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Kohei Asano,

    1. Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Hiroshi Fukuda,

    1. Department of Nuclear Medicine & Radiology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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  • Ryuta Kawashima

    1. Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
    2. Smart Ageing International Research Centre, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
    3. Department of Functional Brain Imaging, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
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Abstract

In this study, we examined linear and curvilinear correlations of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and white matter volume with age by using brain structural and diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a large number of healthy children and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region-of-interest (ROI) analyses. We collected data by brain structural MRI in 246 healthy children, aged 5–18 years. FA and MD images were normalized using the normalization parameter of the corresponding structural MRI. Next, we analyzed the correlations between FA and age and between MD and age by estimating linear and logarithmic functions. We also analyzed the correlation between white matter volume and age by linear, quadratic, and cubic functions. Correlations between FA and age and between MD and age showed exponential trajectories in most ROIs in boys and girls, except for several fibers, such as the corpus callosum connecting the bilateral rectal gyri in boys. The correlation between white matter volume and age showed significant positive linear trajectories in most ROIs in boys and girls, except for a few fibers, such as the bilateral uncinate fasciculus. Additionally, maturational rates differed among major fibers, and in girls, the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which connects the frontal and temporal lobes, showed a slower rate of maturation than other fibers. Our results may help to clarify the mechanisms of normal brain maturation from the viewpoint of brain white matter. Hum Brain Mapp, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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