Impact of young age on prognosis for head and neck cancer: A matched-pair analysis

Authors

  • Jeffrey S. Gilroy MD,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Science Center, P. O. Box 100385, Gainesville, FL 32610-0385, (2000 SW Archer Road, 32608)
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  • Christopher G. Morris MS,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Science Center, P. O. Box 100385, Gainesville, FL 32610-0385, (2000 SW Archer Road, 32608)
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  • Robert J. Amdur MD,

    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Science Center, P. O. Box 100385, Gainesville, FL 32610-0385, (2000 SW Archer Road, 32608)
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  • William M. Mendenhall MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Science Center, P. O. Box 100385, Gainesville, FL 32610-0385, (2000 SW Archer Road, 32608)
    • Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Science Center, P. O. Box 100385, Gainesville, FL 32610-0385, (2000 SW Archer Road, 32608)
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Abstract

Background.

The purpose of this study was to review outcomes of young patients (age <40 years) treated with definitive radiotherapy alone for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, and larynx, and to compare these results with an older matched patient cohort.

Methods.

Since 1983, 30 previously untreated young patients underwent definitive radiotherapy at the University of Florida and were matched with an older group of patients (age >45 years) with respect to primary site, stage of disease, and sex.

Results.

There was no difference in cause-specific survival, locoregional control, or long-term complications between the two groups; however, there was a significant difference in overall survival favoring young patients (p = .0174). Older patients had twice as many second malignancies.

Conclusion.

Young age does not confer a worse prognosis in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx and larynx. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck27: XXX–XXX, 2005

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