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Second malignant neoplasia in early (TIS-T1) glottic carcinoma

Authors

  • Elisabeth V. Sjögren MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery H4-Q, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Postbus 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
    2. Comprehensive Cancer Center West, Leiden, The Netherlands
    • Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery H4-Q, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Postbus 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
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  • Simone Snijder MsS,

    1. Comprehensive Cancer Center West, Leiden, The Netherlands
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  • Joost van Beekum MD,

    1. Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery H4-Q, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Postbus 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
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  • Robert Jan Baatenburg de Jong MD, PhD

    1. Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Presented at the Sixth International Conference on Head and Neck Cancer in Washington DC, August 2004.

Abstract

Background.

We performed a population-based study to determine the incidence and patterns of second malignant neoplasia (SMN) in early glottic carcinoma.

Methods.

All patients diagnosed with Tis-T1 glottic carcinoma in the southwest of the Netherlands between 1982 and 1993 (359) were included. Sources of the data were patient charts and the regional cancer registry.

Results.

SMN incidence was 27.7% (median follow-up, 89 months). Observed-to-expected ratios were increased for lung, bladder, urinary tract, pancreatic, colorectal, and head and neck cancers. The incidence of head and neck and esophageal cancer was surprisingly low.

Conclusions.

Patients with early glottic carcinoma are at a reliably increased risk of the development of tumors not only in the areas of the upper aerodigestive tract, but also in the bladder, pancreas, and colorectum. The low incidence of head and neck and esophageal tumors does not appear to support routine panendoscopy in this patient population. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 28:501–507, 2006

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