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Functional outcome after total and subtotal glossectomy with free flap reconstruction

Authors

  • Chie Yanai DDS, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Clinical Centre for Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Nippon Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
    2. Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
    • Clinical Centre for Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Nippon Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Takesi Kikutani DDS, PhD,

    1. Clinic for Speech and Swallowing Disorders, Nippon Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Masatosi Adachi DDS, PhD,

    1. Clinical Centre for Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Nippon Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Hanna Thoren MD, PhD, DDS,

    1. Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
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  • Munekazu Suzuki DDS, PhD,

    1. Clinical Centre for Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Nippon Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Tateyuki Iizuka MD, PhD, DDS, FEBOMFS

    1. Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
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  • This work was presented at the 18th Congress of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Barcelona, Spain, 13 September 2006.

Abstract

Background

The aim of this study was to evaluate postoperative oral functions of patients who had undergone total or subtotal (75%) glossectomy with preservation of the larynx for oral squamous cell carcinomas.

Methods

Speech intelligibility and swallowing capacity of 17 patients who had been treated between 1992 and 2002 were scored and classified using standard protocols 6 to 36 months postoperatively. The outcomes were finally rated as good, acceptable, or poor.

Results

The 4-year disease-specific survival rate was 64%. Speech intelligibility and swallowing capacity were satisfactory (acceptable or good) in 82.3%. Only 3 patients were still dependent on tube feeding. Good speech perceptibility did not always go together with normal diet tolerance, however.

Conclusions

Our satisfactory results are attributable to the use of large, voluminous soft tissue flaps for reconstruction, and to the instigation of postoperative swallowing and speech therapy on a routine basis and at an early juncture. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2008

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