COX-2 polymorphisms and the risk for head and neck cancer in white patients

Authors

  • Wilbert H. M. Peters PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    • Department of Gastroenterology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Martin Lacko MD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
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  • Rene H. M. te Morsche BSc,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Adri C. Voogd PhD,

    1. Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
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  • Michael B. Oude Ophuis MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Vie Curi Medical Center, Venlo, The Netherlands
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  • Johannes J. Manni MD, PhD

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Abstract

Background.

Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxanes, which are regulators of processes such as inflammation, cell proliferation, and angiogenesis, all relevant for cancer development. We investigated whether functional genetic polymorphisms in COX-2 may have a risk-modifying effect on head and neck carcinogenesis.

Methods.

Blood from 431 white patients with oral, pharyngeal, or laryngeal carcinoma and 438 white healthy controls was investigated for the presence of 2 functional promoter region polymorphisms (−1195A→G and −765G→C) in COX-2.

Results.

Logistic regression analysis did not show differences in COX-2 genotype distributions between patients and controls. Also no differences were found when stratified according to tumor localization, sex, or tobacco consumption.

Conclusion.

In contrast to earlier reports on the role of these COX-2 polymorphisms in mediating susceptibility to squamous esophageal carcinoma in a Chinese population, we could not demonstrate a risk-modifying effect in head and neck carcinogenesis in whites. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2009

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