Selective culture of different types of human parotid gland cells

Authors

  • Yen-Hui Chan,

    1. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Tsung-Wei Huang MD,

    1. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
    2. Department of Otolaryngology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
    3. Department of Health Care Ministration, Oriental Institute of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Tai-Horng Young PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
    • Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Pei-Jen Lou MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
    • Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
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Abstract

Background.

Advances in salivary gland tissue engineering can benefit patients diagnosed with xerostomia. Complexity of the gland explains the urgent demand for a reliable protocol to isolate and expand various gland cells that can be used for further study.

Methods.

Three cells with different morphologies were isolated from the same human parotid glands using different culture medium systems and then were identified by the expressions from mRNA to the protein level.

Results.

Among the 34 specimens, parotid gland acinar cells, myoepithelial cells, and fibroblasts expressing specific markers that belonged to individual cell types, were successfully isolated and expanded from 30 specimens without a complex mechanical process and expensive flow technique.

Conclusion.

The proposed protocol is simple with a high success rate to culture various gland cells, making it highly promising for use in future tissue engineering studies. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2010

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