Surgical salvage of persistent or recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma with maxillary swing approach — Critical appraisal after 2 decades

Authors

  • William I. Wei MS, FRCS, FRCSE, FRACS (Hon.),

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Centre, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China
    • Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Centre, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China
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  • Jimmy Yu Wai Chan MS, FRCSE,

    1. Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Centre, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China
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  • Raymond Wai Man Ng MS, FRCSE,

    1. Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Centre, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China
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  • Wai Kuen Ho FRCSE

    1. Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Centre, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China
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Abstract

Background

The purpose of this study was to report on our experience on salvage nasopharyngectomy using the maxillary swing approach for persistent or recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma after primary treatment.

Methods

Over the past 2 decades, we have performed salvage nasopharyngectomies for 246 patients. Thirty-seven patients (15%) had persistent disease and 209 (85%) had recurrent tumors.

Results

All patients survived the operation with minimal morbidity. Negative resection margins were achieved in 191 patients (78%), and 55 patients (22%) had microscopic residual disease. The median follow-up was 38 months. The 5-year actuarial control of disease in the nasopharynx was 74%. The 5-year disease-free survival was 56%. Cox regression model identified the negative resection margin and the size of the tumor as 2 independent factors that affected local control of disease and survival.

Conclusion

Maxillary swing nasopharyngectomy is an effective salvage procedure for a small, persistent, or recurrent tumor in the nasopharynx after primary therapy. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2011

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