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Morbidities after maxillary swing nasopharyngectomy for recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

Authors

  • Jimmy Yu Wai Chan MD, MS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Research, University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China
    • Corresponding author: J. Y. W. Chan, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR, China, Telephone: (852) 2255 4394, Fax: (852) 2819 3780, E-mail: chanjyw@gmail.com

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  • Raymond King Yin Tsang MD,

    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Research, University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China
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  • William Ignace Wei MD, MS

    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Research, University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China
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Abstract

Background

The purpose of this study was to investigate the complications after maxillary swing nasopharyngectomy.

Methods

Salvage nasopharyngectomy was performed for 338 patients during 1990 to 2012. Patient and tumor characteristics, perioperative and intraoperative information, and long-term morbidities were analyzed.

Results

There were significantly more patients with locally advanced tumors (rT3 and rT4) operated during the recent study period (2002–2012). However, the mean operative time and blood loss was significantly lower than in the earlier period (1990–2001). There was no hospital mortality. There was a significant reduction in the postoperative trismus and palatal fistula formation. Patients with locally advanced tumor, particularly those who required adjuvant chemoradiation, had a higher chance of facial numbness, nasal blockage, and swallowing problems after surgery.

Conclusion

Salvage nasopharyngectomy via the maxillary swing approach is safe with acceptable long-term morbidities. Prevention of complications associated with surgery, particularly for patients with locally advanced tumors, is crucial to ensure the best outcome of surgery. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 37: 487–492, 2015

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