Innervation of the trapezius muscle: A study in patients undergoing neck dissections

Authors

  • Dr. K. C. Soo MBBS, FRACS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Academic Surgical Unit, the Royal Marsden Hospital, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, London, United Kingdom
    • Department of Surgery, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Singapore 0316
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  • Dr. R. J. Guiloff MD, FRCP,

    1. Department of Neurology, West-minster Hospital, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, London, United Kingdom
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  • Dr. A. Oh MBBS, MPH,

    1. Statistical Office, Department of International Economic and Social Affairs (Dr. Oh), United Nations, New York, NY
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  • Dr. G. Querci Della Rovere MD, FRCS,

    1. Academic Surgical Unit, the Royal Marsden Hospital, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, London, United Kingdom
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  • Dr. G. Westbury FRCS, FRCP

    1. Academic Surgical Unit, the Royal Marsden Hospital, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, London, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Twenty-four patients with surgical section of the accessory nerve and/or its cervical contribution(s) were examined from 1 to 156 months after surgery, and compared to twenty controls. Thirteen patients had a classical neck dissection; seven had the whole length of the accessory nerve preserved but not the cervical plexus contributions. Four had the upper half of the accessory nerve sectioned, but with preservation of both the lower half and its cervical contributions. Clinical and electrophysiological studies of the three portions of the trapezius suggested the existence of an undescribed motor nerve supply to the trapezius and of a motor input from the cervical plexus contributions via the accessory nerve. The former is also supported by an anatomical study.

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