The Effect of Mouse Hepatitis Virus Infection on the Microcirculation of the Liver

Authors

  • Gary A. Levy,

    Corresponding author
    1. Liver Disease Unit, Sunnybrook Medical Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N 3M5
    • Gary A. Levy, M. D., Liver Disease Unit, Sunnybrook Medical Center, 2075 Bayview Avenue, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N 3M5.
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    • Dr. Levy is the recipient of a Medical Research Council of Canada Scholarship.

  • Peggy J. Macphee,

    1. Liver Disease Unit, Sunnybrook Medical Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N 3M5
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  • Lai Sum Fung,

    1. Liver Disease Unit, Sunnybrook Medical Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N 3M5
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  • Murray M. Fisher,

    1. Liver Disease Unit, Sunnybrook Medical Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N 3M5
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  • Aron M. Rappaport

    1. Liver Disease Unit, Sunnybrook Medical Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N 3M5
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Abstract

Mouse hepatitis virus type 3 infection results in strain-dependent liver disease. The effects of mouse hepatitis virus type 3 on the microcirculation of the liver in both fully susceptible (Balb/cJ) and fully resistant (A/J) mice were studied. In Balb/cJ mice, 6 to 12 hr following infection, abnormalities in liver blood flow were observed which consisted of granular blood flow in both terminal hepatic and terminal portal venules. In addition, sinusoidal microthrombi were present predominantly in periportal areas. By 24 to 48 hr, liver cell edema and small focal lesions were prominent. At 48 hr, thrombi and hepatocellular necrosis were widespread, and blood was shunted from damaged areas into patent sinusoids. In sharp contrast to these abnormal findings, normal streamlined blood flow was present in the resistant A/J animals at all time points following infection. Since large amounts of virus were demonstrated by immunofluorescene in and by recovery and growth from livers of both resistant and susceptible strains, the presence of the virus per se cannot explain the abnormalities observed.

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