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Abstract

To determine whether the aminopyrine breath test can be used to document the presence of cirrhosis in patients with cholestatic liver disease, 19 patients (13 primary biliary cirrhosis, 4 sclerosing cholangitis and 2 chronic extrahepatic bile duct obstruction) underwent clinical and biochemical evaluations, liver biopsies and an aminopyrine breath test. Results were compared with those in 10 patients with biopsy-proven chronic active hepatitis with bridging and/or cirrhosis and in 22 healthy subjects. The aminopyrine breath test results in the 10 cholestatic patients with cirrhosis were not significantly different from the results in precirrhotic cholestatic patients (mean ± S.D., 11.2 ± 5.0 vs. 11.6 ± 2.8 %dose per 2 hr, p < 0.05) or healthy subjects (11.5 ± 2.9 %dose per 2 hr). In contrast, the results in the patients with chronic hepatitis were markedly depressed (3.2 ± 1.9 %dose per 2 hr, p < 0.05). The aminopyrine breath test results did not correlate with results of conventional liver function tests in the cholestatic patients. These results demonstrate that the aminopyrine breath test is not clinically useful in identifying the presence of cirrhosis in patients with cholestatic liver disease, and provide further evidence that decreased microsomal enzyme function is a late feature of cholestatic liver disease.