Portal hemodynamics during nitroglycerin administration in cirrhotic patients

Authors

  • Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao,

    1. Hepatic Hemodynamic Laboratory, Veterans Administration Medical Center, West Haven, Connecticut 06516 and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510
    Current affiliation:
    1. Departamento de Gastroenterologia, Instituto Nacional de la Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Avenida San Fernando Y, Viaducto Tlalpan, Mexico 22 D.F., Mexico
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  • Roberto J. Groszmann M.D.

    Corresponding author
    1. Hepatic Hemodynamic Laboratory, Veterans Administration Medical Center, West Haven, Connecticut 06516 and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510
    • Hepatic Hemodynamic Laboratory/111/J., Veterans Administration Medical Center, West Spring Street, West Haven, Connecticut 06516
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Abstract

Nitroglycerin is a potent venous dilator and a mild arterial vasodilator that has been shown to improve the hemodynamic response to vasopressin in portal hypertensive patients and to decrease portal pressure in experimental animals. In order to determine the effect of nitroglycerin on portal venous hemodynamics, we studied 11 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis before and during the administration of sublingual nitroglycerin (0.4 and 0.6 mg). The hepatic venous pressure gradient (which was obtained by subtracting the free hepatic venous pressure from the wedged hepatic venous pressure) decreased from 17.9 ± 6.5 mm Hg (mean ± S.D.) to 15.1 ± 5.1 mm Hg (p < 0.02) at the peak of the effect, which occurred from 2 to 12 min after nitroglycerin administration. The mean arterial pressure was reduced from 96 ± 10 mm Hg to a peak decrease of 76 ± 18 mm Hg (p < 0.001). The peak change in the hepatic venous pressure gradient induced by nitroglycerin correlated directly with the peak change in mean arterial pressure (r = 0.79, p < 0.01). There was a moderate increase in heart rate in response to the decrease in blood pressure (73 ± 15 to 83 ± 15 beats per min, p < 0.001). Two of the 11 patients did not reduce their hepatic venous pressure gradient after 0.6 mg nitroglycerin. Reductions in portal pressure were observed with both increases and moderate decreases in azygos blood flow, suggesting that, as observed in experimental animals, the portal-pressure-reducing effect of nitroglycerin could be due to two different and independent mechanisms, a reduction in portal blood flow or portal-collateral vasodilatation.

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