Advertisement

Is the magnetic resonance imaging proton spin-lattice relaxation time a reliable noninvasive parameter of developing liver fibrosis?

Authors

  • Robert A. F. M. Chamuleau M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Applied Physics, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
    • Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, AMC, Meibergdreef 9, G 2–130, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Joris H. N. Creyghton Ineke De Nie,

    1. Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Applied Physics, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Marinus A. Moerland,

    1. Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Applied Physics, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Otto R. Van der Lende,

    1. Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Applied Physics, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jaap Smidt

    1. Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Applied Physics, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

During the development of liver fibrosis in rats by an individual dose-titrated CCl4 administration, hepatic proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) has been measured in vivo every 2 weeks for 8 weeks. Liver content of collagen, triglycerides and water has been measured biochemically in biopsy material.

After 4 weeks of CCl4 treatment, T1 increased signifcantly and remained at the same level, whereas liver collagen reached its maximum at 8 weeks. It is concluded that, under our experimental conditions, increased hepatic T1 represents drug-induced edema and that hepatic T1 is not a reliable noninvasive parameter for developing liver fibrosis in vivo.

Ancillary