Correlation of IgM anti-hepatitis D virus (HDV) to HDV RNA in sera of chronic HDV

Authors

  • Sugantha Govindarajan M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Southern California Liver Unit and Department of Medicine and Pathology, Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center, Downey, California 90242
    • Department of Pathology, Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center, 7705 Golon–drinas St., Bldg, 1200, Downey, California 90242
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  • Sanjeev Gupta,

    1. University of Southern California Liver Unit and Department of Medicine and Pathology, Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center, Downey, California 90242
    Current affiliation:
    1. Liver Research Center, Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461
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  • Boontar Valinluck,

    1. University of Southern California Liver Unit and Department of Medicine and Pathology, Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center, Downey, California 90242
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  • Allan G. Redeker

    1. University of Southern California Liver Unit and Department of Medicine and Pathology, Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center, Downey, California 90242
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Abstract

One hundred forty-four serum samples from 52 patients with chronic hepatitis D virus infection were analyzed for hepatitis D virus RNA by dot-blot hybridization using hepatitis D virus cDNA probe labeled with 32p. The results were correlated with the presence of serum IgM anti-hepatitis D virus and hepatitis D antigen in liver biopsy specimens when available. Although there was a trend of positive correlation between serum hepatitis D virus RNA and IgM anti-hepatitis D virus, no statistical significance could be found. In the serum samples with hepatitis D virus RNA, 32% were found to be negative for IgM anti-hepatitis D virus. Therefore, in chronic hepatitis D virus, absence of IgM anti-hepatitis D virus does not rule out active viral infection, as suggested by previous studies. There was a strong correlation between serum hepatitis D virus RNA and hepatic hepatitis D virus antigen. These data indicate that detection of hepatitis D virus RNA in serum samples is a reliable noninvasive marker of active viral infection.

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